Tag Archives: wanting to make a difference

Follow Your Passion

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Follow Your Passion

Do you remember what your passion is? Are you happily living your passion?

When I ask random people one of my favorite questions “If you had a Billion dollars, what would you be doing?” 8 out of 10 will tell me: quit my job, pay off all my bills, buy [whatever toys], and take a vacation. When I dig a little deeper I hear: I don’t know or I never really thought of that.

Why are dreams stamped out by others?

When I told my dad that I wanted to be a parapsychologist and get my degree at Duke University, he told me parapsychology is a rich man’s hobby.

When I wanted to be a priest (I went to Catholic school) the head nun told me that only a man can become a priest. As a woman I can become a nun. What is up with that?

Why do we allow others to stamp out our dreams?

It wasn’t until this year that I decided that I serve the world better when I do what makes me happy. I enjoy meeting people, talking to people, hearing about their dreams and goals, and helping them attain them. Not only do I get a sense of accomplishment, I am a positive role model for my son and his friends.

My son has always been taught that he can accomplish anything he set his mind to as long as he decides every day that that is what he wants to do and is working towards the goal. When it comes to swim practice I don’t have to force him as he is the one who will be upset with the results of his next meet. I have always taught him about accountability and responsibility. That he is the creator of his life and through his decisions makes his own path.

Sometimes the push that others give, put us on a better road that the original one

I got my bachelor in Business (my 10th declared major – my parents just wanted me to finish “with PE if needed”) and then got a master in IT. I must admit that I truly feel in my element when I restructure a business that has grown too fast, make a computer system scalable, and teach coworkers professional skills.  There is so much more that I have in my sights and decide every day to move towards.

Maybe dreams ARE just goals with no deadline… I can still become a parapsychologist; however, I don’t want to be a priest any more. If it wasn’t for some of my “dream stealers” I wouldn’t have my big dreams now or love what I do.

 

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Are you answering your question?

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Are you answering your question?

I know I was raised to get a good education, get a good paying job and I will be happy. I found this not to be true.

I got a bachelor in business and a master in IT. Most of the time I had to dumb down my resume to even be considered for a position, then when I got the job I out grew it within months. My mind was different than most of my coworkers. I learned what I had to do, then I would look at how the system worked. My way of thinking is make the system as effective and efficient as possible. This didn’t go over well most of the time. Many supervisors thought I was trying to take their position… furthest thing from my mind. Also when I lost the feeling of accomplishment or saw that they preferred to be redundant and obsolete I had to leave.

I need to feel like I am making a difference in other people’s lives. My favorite position to date was when I went door to door as “acquisitions” and customer service for a telecommunication company. Their new service was becoming available in small pockets of the county. I was the person to introduce customers to the new product and make sure they were satisfied with what they currently had. I loved training my co-workers, meeting people at their homes, and helping them save money after looking over their bills and making them aware of their service and spending. One customer saved over $150 per month with this new program and looking up the number instead of calling 411. Not everyone was open to the new service and I was only yelled at once – by a man who told me to come back.

I was honest and told people when what they currently had was the best they could afford. I got phone calls thanking me by their families for being so honest. I was the face of customer service in the areas that I oversaw. I held this position over 6 years ago and sometimes will run into someone that I had visited. I was impressed that those I ran into remembered my name and truly cared about my well being. Just recollecting the artist at a Arts Festival in South Miami or a woman at Costco brings me to tears knowing that I made such an impact that they remembered me so long after I had visited them at their homes.

I feel that this is the answer to my life questions. How can I best serve my community? How can I truly make a positive difference?